New apartment building, at 1601 Washington Avenue, may be the beginning of change on Washington Avenue

future site of 1601 washington ave. apartments and retailWashington Avenue, west of Broad Street, is a historically industrial street.  For decades it was lined with active factories and warehouses, the largest industrial corridor in South Philadelphia not adjacent to the waterfront.  As time went by, most of the factories closed down and the industrial buildings were converted almost entirely into home building and decorating supply warehouses, some with pedestrian-accessible showrooms.  As the city’s housing market has boomed, these businesses have grown and sometimes have been renovated.  However, many people believe that with housing development in the Graduate Hospital neighborhood reaching a limit of available space and the outdated layout of these warehouse buildings, that Washington Avenue should see redevelopment.  Several small apartment developments are planned for Washington Avenue, one at 20th Street and Washington, another at 18th Street and Washington, and the largest at 16th Street and Washington Avenue.

The development at 1601 Washington Avenue, designed by RHC Design LLC, will be five storeys tall and have 35 apartment units.  The exterior will have modern panels and traditional looking windows, with Juliet balconies and a rooftop deck.  There will be retail on both Washington Avenue and 16th Street, and a parking entrance on Washington Avenue leading to 20 ground level parking spaces behind the building.  The property is currently part of a parking lot for a grocery store set back from Washington Avenue.  1601 Washington Avenue will be built on a diamond-shaped parcel of land that is separate from the grocery store and the rest of its parking lot.  This juxtaposition to the existing grocery store caused concern in the neighborhood, but after much testimony at Planning Commission and Zoning Board hearings, both the Planning Commission and Zoning Board voted to approve the project, agreeing with some neighbors who believe that industrial and warehouse uses, as well as, suburban-style strip malls, were not the best use for Washington Avenue properties nowadays.

This new development, like I said, could start a new trend of new residential and commercial development on this stretch of Washington Avenue.  When I was in the neighborhood the other day, I found out that one of the buildings near 19th Street was for sale, then I found out that the building directly across the street was also for sale.  Besides the developments planned at 18th and 20th Streets, there are plans to convert the large former Frankford Chocolate Factory, at 22nd Street and Washington Avenue, into apartments and there is a large new townhouse and condo project being built at 17th & Carpenter Streets, called Carpenter Square, and a site across the street that will be redeveloped by a developer that was chosen last week by the Redevelopment Authority.  On the northwestern corner of 17th & Carpenter, an empty lot is about to be converted into a neighborhood park called Carpenter Green, which is probably one reason why this apartment building at 1601 Washington Avenue is being built at this time.  Washington Avenue could, also, attract artists and creative companies in existing and newly constructed buildings.  NextFab Studios, which provides work spaces, machinery, and tools for artists and creative companies has recently opened up a few blocks west of 1601 Washington.  Also, an old warehouse just south of Washington Avenue, at 25 & Ellsworth Streets, is being renovated into loft-style apartments.  As if all this isn’t enough, the University of Pennsylvania is starting to redevelop the former Dupont Labs site on the Schuylkill River, just off of Gray’s Ferry Avenue near the western end of Washington Avenue, with a mix of research facilities and office and lab space for private high-tech companies.

At Broad and Washington, developer Bart Blatstein is planning a huge shopping center development, which hopefully will include some residential towers as well, and South Broad Street is experiencing several new developments, such as the Southstar Lofts apartment building, at Broad and South Streets, and the SLS International Hotel and Condominiums, at Broad and Spruce Streets.  The redevelopment of Washington Avenue seems almost inevitable with this huge amount of housing development happening nearby.

If you are looking to buy or sell a home or investment property in the Graduate Hospital or Point Breeze neighborhoods, or any other neighborhood in the city, please contact me at gabriel.gottlieb@lnf.com or check out my Long & Foster agent portal, here, or learn more about our Long & Foster Center City office, here.  You can, also, check out my Facebook realtor page, Gabriel G. Philly Realtor, or follow my twitter page, @GabrielGPhilaRE.  And, you can look at the ZBA approval, here, and view renderings and my pictures of the site and neighborhood, below.

Site diagram of 1601 Washington Avenue apartments shows retail and parking on the ground level

Site diagram of 1601 Washington Avenue apartments shows retail and parking on the ground level

Elevation rendering of 1601 Washington Avenue, showing Washington Avenue side and retail

Elevation rendering of 1601 Washington Avenue, showing Washington Avenue side and retail

1601 Washington Avenue, and shopping center, from across Washington Avenue

1601 Washington Avenue, and shopping center, from across Washington Avenue

Elevation rendering of 1601 Washington Avenue showing the 16th Street side and more retail space

Elevation rendering of 1601 Washington Avenue showing the 16th Street side and more retail space

Future site of 1601 Washington Avenue apartments, at the corner

Future site of 1601 Washington Avenue apartments, at the corner

Supermarket behind 1601 Washington Avenue

Supermarket behind 1601 Washington Avenue

Warehouse and store across Washington Avenue

Warehouse and store across Washington Avenue

Street signs at 16th Street and Washington Avenue

Street signs at 16th Street and Washington Avenue

Looking west down Washington Avenue, from 16th Street

Looking west down Washington Avenue, from 16th Street

Looking east down Washington Avenue, from 16th Street

Looking east down Washington Avenue, from 16th Street

Looking north up 16th Street, towards Center City, from 1601 Washington Avenue

Looking north up 16th Street, towards Center City, from 1601 Washington Avenue

Carpenter Square, under construction on 17th Street, around the corner from 1601 Washington Avenue site

Carpenter Square, under construction on 17th Street, around the corner from 1601 Washington Avenue site

Looking up 17th Street, and at the future development site across from Carpenter Square

Looking up 17th Street, and at the future development site across from Carpenter Square

This site on 17th Street, across from Carpenter Square and around the corner from 1601 Washington Avenue, has just been sold to a developer by the Redevelopment Authority

This site on 17th Street, across from Carpenter Square and around the corner from 1601 Washington Avenue, has just been sold to a developer by the Redevelopment Authority

This lot, on the northwest corner of 17th and Carpenter Streets, is the future site of Carpenter Green

This lot, on the northwest corner of 17th and Carpenter Streets, is the future site of Carpenter Green

Sign announcing Carpenter Green

Sign announcing Carpenter Green

Corner of 18th Street and Washington Avenue may, also, have a new apartment building soon

Corner of 18th Street and Washington Avenue may, also, have a new apartment building soon

Corner of 20th Street and Washington Avenue may have a new apartment building

Corner of 20th Street and Washington Avenue may have a new apartment building

New apartment building on 20th Street, just north of Washington Avenue

New apartment building on 20th Street, just north of Washington Avenue

NextFab Studios is down the street from 1601 Washington Avenue

NextFab Studios is down the street from 1601 Washington Avenue

The former Frankford Chocolate Factory, at 22nd Street and Washington Avenue, may be converted into apartments soon

The former Frankford Chocolate Factory, at 22nd Street and Washington Avenue, may be converted into apartments soon

This vacant warehouse, at 25th and Ellsworth Streets, is to be converted into apartments soon

This vacant warehouse, at 25th and Ellsworth Streets, is to be converted into apartments soon

Northwest corner of Broad and Washington, two blocks from 1601 Washington Avenue, is a prime spot for future development

Northwest corner of Broad and Washington, two blocks from 1601 Washington Avenue, is a prime spot for future development

Huge lot, at northeast corner of Broad and Washington, is about to be redeveloped by Bart Blatstein

Huge lot, at northeast corner of Broad and Washington, is about to be redeveloped by Bart Blatstein

Sign announcing new retail space at northeast corner of Broad and Washington

Sign announcing new retail space at northeast corner of Broad and Washington

777 South Broad Street apartments, at Broad and Fitzwater Streets

777 South Broad Street apartments, at Broad and Fitzwater Streets

Southstar Lofts apartments, at Broad and South Streets

Southstar Lofts apartments, at Broad and South Streets

Symphony House Condominiums and Suzanne Roberts Theatre, at Broad and Pine Streets

Symphony House Condominiums and Suzanne Roberts Theatre, at Broad and Pine Streets

Future site of SLS Hotel and Condominiums, at Broad and Spruce Streets

Future site of SLS Hotel and Condominiums, at Broad and Spruce Streets

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Long vacant Mt. Sinai Hospital buildings to be renovated into apartments in Pennsport

mt. sinai 1927 buildingLast summer I wrote about the Pennsport neighborhood in South Philadelphia.  Pennsport is south of Washington Avenue and just east of Columbus Boulevard, and it includes Jefferson Square and Dickinson Square Parks.  While the neighborhood is solidly middle-class and has little vacancy, it has been burdened by the hulking remains of the Mt. Sinai Hospital between Fourth and Fifth Streets and Reed and Dickinson Streets, just a few blocks north of the newly renovated Dickinson Square Park.  All but one building, in the complex, has been vacant for about seventeen years, and the vacant buildings are large enough to be seen from a distance.  The vacant hospital had been built in two phases, a six-storey brown-brick building, that was built in 1927 on Fifth Street, and a very modern extension on Fourth Street, also made of brown brick with large, modern plate-glass windows.  The red-brick former nurse’s home, on the corner of Fifth and Reed, has long since been renovated into senior housing.  A few years ago, a developer planned to renovate the existing vacant hospital (and add some floors) and create condos, but that plan fell through in the recession and real estate market crash of a few years ago.  Now, another developer would like to renovate the existing building into apartments and add some townhouses and a commercial space.

The renovation, being developed by Greenpointe Construction and designed by Barton Partners, will have 175 apartments and 37 townhouses.  The apartments will consist of 128 one-bedroom units, approximately 600 to 900 square feet, and 47 two-bedroom units, approximately 750 to 1,280 square feet.  The townhouses will be built on former surface parking lots at Fourth & Reed and on Fifth and Dickinson Streets.  The homes on Dickinson and Fifth Streets will have very traditional looking designs, but the homes at Fourth & Reed will have a very modern design, with modern panels and large picture windows and terraces.  The former ambulance drop off zone on Fourth Street will be filled in and used for a retail space of about 2,500 square feet, preferably a large restaurant, and there will be additional amenities inside for residents and some green space on the grounds.  There will be 157 parking spaces, mostly in a three storey parking structure on Fourth Street, and 79 bike parking spaces, and all the parking for the townhouses will be internal, so no garages facing the street.  The developers hope to have the original hospital building historically certified, so as to access historic tax credits.  Greenpointe received approval last week, on March 5, from the Zoning Board of Adjustment after a marathon hearing, so they can seek financing and tax credits and start construction of the first phase of townhomes in a timely manner.

The renovated Mt. Sinai Hospital would be a wonderful addition to the improved Pennsport/Jefferson Square/Dickinson Square West neighborhood.  Across Reed Street, the Jefferson Square Community Development Corporation rebuilt a blighted section of the neighborhood with expansive, family-style rowhomes about a decade ago.  The community groups have also been renovating Jefferson Square Park and the former Southwark housing project on Washington Avenue, in Queen Village, was also rebuilt over a decade ago.  Washington Avenue, Fifth Street, and Fourth Street have been experiencing quite a bit of new development in recent years, as have the busy nearby shopping districts on South Street (north of Pennsport), the Ninth Street (Italian) Market, and Passyunk Avenue (west of Pennsport).

If you are interested in buying or selling a home or investment property in South Philadelphia, or any other neighborhood in the city, please contact me at gabriel.gottlieb@lnf.com or check out my Long & Foster agent portal, here, or check out our Long & Foster Center City office, here.  You can, also, view my Facebook realtor page, Gabriel G. Philly Realtor, or my twitter page, @GabrielGPhilaRE.  You can view the ZBA decision, here, and check out renderings and my pictures of the site and neighborhood, below.

Rendering of Mt. Sinai Hospital redevelopment

Rendering of Mt. Sinai Hospital redevelopment

Aerial rendering of Mt. Sinai Hospital redevelopment

Aerial rendering of Mt. Sinai Hospital redevelopment

Mt. Sinai Hospital building, and parking lot, at Fourth and Reed Streets

Mt. Sinai Hospital building, and parking lot, at Fourth and Reed Streets

Mt. Sinai parking lot, at 4th and Reed Streets, will be replaced by townhouses

Mt. Sinai parking lot, at 4th and Reed Streets, will be replaced by townhouses

Rendering of modern townhouses at Fourth and Reed Streets

Rendering of modern townhouses at Fourth and Reed Streets

Modern wing of Mt. Sinai Hospital shows future retail (restaurant) space on Fourth Street

Modern wing of Mt. Sinai Hospital shows future retail (restaurant) space on Fourth Street

Original 1927 Mt. Sinai Hospital building, from Fifth Street

Original 1927 Mt. Sinai Hospital building, from Fifth Street

Mt. Sinai Hospital building at the corner of Fifth and Dickinson Streets

Mt. Sinai Hospital building at the corner of Fifth and Dickinson Streets

Site of the parking garage, behind the modern wing on Fourth Street

Site of the parking garage, behind the modern wing on Fourth Street

Former Mt. Sinai Nurse's Home, at Fifth and Reed Streets, is a senior apartment building

Former Mt. Sinai Nurse’s Home, at Fifth and Reed Streets, is a senior apartment building

Sign above the entrance of the former Mt. Sinai Nurse's Home

Sign above the entrance of the former Mt. Sinai Nurse’s Home

Sign for the senior apartment building in the former Nurse's Home

Sign for the senior apartment building in the former Nurse’s Home

Sign of former Mt. Sinai Hospital, at Fourth and Reed Streets

Sign of former Mt. Sinai Hospital, at Fourth and Reed Streets

Street signs at Fourth and Reed Streets

Street signs at Fourth and Reed Streets

Looking south down Fourth Street, across the street from Mt. Sinai Hospital

Looking south down Fourth Street, across the street from Mt. Sinai Hospital

Looking north up Fourth Street, towards Queen Village and Society Hill in Center City

Looking north up Fourth Street, towards Queen Village and Society Hill in Center City

Expansive rowhomes built by Jefferson Square Community Development Corporation, across Reed Street from Mt. Sinai Hospital

Expansive rowhomes built by Jefferson Square Community Development Corporation, across Reed Street from Mt. Sinai Hospital

Looking west on Reed Street

Looking west on Reed Street

Cafe on Fourth Street, a couple blocks south of likely new restaurant in Mt. Sinai Hospital conversion

Cafe on Fourth Street, a couple blocks south of likely new restaurant in Mt. Sinai Hospital conversion

Construction site of new home on Fourth Street, near Dickinson Square Park and a couple blocks south of Mt. Sinai Hospital

Construction site of new home on Fourth Street, near Dickinson Square Park and a couple blocks south of Mt. Sinai Hospital

Beautiful Dickinson Square Park, on Fourth Street, a couple blocks south of Mt. Sinai Hospital buildings

Beautiful Dickinson Square Park, on Fourth Street, a couple blocks south of Mt. Sinai Hospital buildings

New construction on Moyamensing Avenue, a couple blocks east of former Mt. Sinai Hospital

New construction on Moyamensing Avenue, a couple blocks east of former Mt. Sinai Hospital

Looking north up Moyamensing Avenue, through Queen Village to South Street

Looking north up Moyamensing Avenue, through Queen Village to South Street

Mummers marching through Pennsport on 2 Street (Second Street)

Mummers marching through Pennsport on 2 Street (Second Street)

Washington Avenue, north of the former Mt. Sinai Hospital

Washington Avenue, north of the former Mt. Sinai Hospital

Jefferson Square Park, at Fourth Street and Washington Avenue

Jefferson Square Park, at Fourth Street and Washington Avenue

Ninth Street (Italian) Market, four blocks west of the former Mt. Sinai Hospital

Ninth Street (Italian) Market, four blocks west of the former Mt. Sinai Hospital

Passyunk Avenue, west of the former Mt. Sinai Hospital

Passyunk Avenue, west of the former Mt. Sinai Hospital

This huge lot at Broad Street and Washington Avenue may have a large shopping complex someday soon

This huge lot at Broad Street and Washington Avenue may have a large shopping complex someday soon

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Museum Towers II is another big apartment development in Fairmount (Franklintown), but also has some townhouses

museumtowersIIAnother major rental housing development is about to be built in the Fairmount (Franklintown) neighborhood, just north of the Ben Franklin Parkway.  This new development will be an extension of the Museum Towers apartment building at 18th and Spring Garden and Buttonwood Streets, just north of the Matthias Baldwin Park (formerly Franklintown Park), and will be built on what is now a surface parking lot.  It is being developed by Forest City and designed by Perkins Eastman Architects and Studio Bryan Hanes.  This new development will be mostly apartments, but will have some large, luxury townhouses.

The new development will be called, simply enough, Museum Towers II.  It will be located just north of Matthias Baldwin Park, with a 16-storey highrise apartment tower on 18th Street and 16 townhouses facing the park and 19th Street.  The townhouses and tower will surround, and mostly hide, a 400 space parking garage.  The tower will have 270 upscale apartments and will have a modern, largely glass exterior.  The first floor will have a skylit lobby connected to Museum Towers I and community spaces for the whole complex.  There will, also, be a rooftop terrace on the top of the tower.  The townhouses will be three storeys, and the ones facing the park will be accessible from inside and have backyard decks and patios facing the park and skyline, while the townhouses facing 19th Street will have the front door along the street, across from The Tivoli Condominiums.  There will be some fencing on the top floor of the garage to hide it from the street, and park, views.  There will be a gate, along the north side of Baldwin Park, in order to separate the backyards of the those townhouses that run along the park, from the park itself.  The developers, also, plan to pay for renovations to Baldwin Park, including new lighting, paths, and benches.  Museum Towers II has recently been presented at the Planning Commission’s Civic Design Review meeting in January and will soon be considered by the full Planning Commission and likely the Zoning Board of Adjustment.  The development has been supported by the Logan Square Neighbor’s Association.

This is just the latest development in the Franklintown/Fairmount neighborhood.  The Granary Apartments, around the corner from Museum Towers, has recently opened up adding several retail spaces, that include a large pet store and several eateries, while the large Rodin Square development, with a one-acre plus Whole Foods supermarket and hundreds of apartments, will soon replace the recently-closed Best Western Hotel at 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue.  Another apartment development is proposed to be built on top of the former City Branch rail line and the Church of Latter Day Saints is planning to build a residential and commercial development, eventually, on the large parking lot at 16th and Vine Streets, across from their new Mormon Temple.  The City Branch right-of-way, which is submerged, may be renovated with a SEPTA bus rapid transit line and bike/walking paths, someday.  As if that isn’t enough, two large new midrise apartment buildings are proposed for the parking lots at Broad and Callowhill Streets and there may be new casino at the old Inquirer Building, along Callowhill Street, from Broad Street to 16th Street.  Also, the Ben Franklin Parkway is being enhanced with the new Barnes Foundation museum, at 20th Street,  the renovation and expansion of the Central Library, at 19th and Vine Streets, the renovation of the Rodin Museum, and the eventual renovation of the old Family Courts building into some kind of luxury hotel.  The Parkway, itself, is slowing being improved to be more fun and pedestrian-friendly, including the complete renovation of Sister Cities Park, which is just down the street from Museum Towers II on 18th Street.  And, as is well-known now, Comcast and Liberty Property Trust are about to build the second, taller Comcast tower, and new apartment developments are being built at 1900 Arch Street, 17th and Arch Streets, and 23rd and Summer Streets.

If you’re interested in buying or selling a home or investment property in Fairmount, or any other neighborhood in the city, please contact me at Gabriel.gottlieb@lnf.com or check out my Long & Foster agent portal, here, and you can learn more about our Long & Foster Center City office, here.  And, you can check out my Facebook realtor page, Gabriel G. Philly Realtor, and my twitter page, @GabrielGPhilaRE.  Also, you can view this summary of the Civic Design Review meeting’s discussions and recommendations, here, and look at renderings and my pictures of the site and neighborhood, below.

Overview of Museum Towers complex

Overview of Museum Towers complex

Site of the future townhouses at Museum Towers, at 19th Street and north of Matthias Baldwin Park

Site of the future townhouses at Museum Towers, at 19th Street and north of Matthias Baldwin Park

Townhouses along 19th Street and Baldwin Park

Townhouses along 19th Street and Baldwin Park

Looking south into Matthias Baldwin Park, from 19th Street

Looking south into Matthias Baldwin Park, from 19th Street

Sign, on 19th Street, explains the history of the Baldwin Locomotive Works

Sign, on 19th Street, explains the history of the Baldwin Locomotive Works

Looking back at the site of Museum Towers II and the existing Museum Towers building and Spring Garden Tower, from Baldwin Park to the south

Looking back at the site of Museum Towers II and the existing Museum Towers building and Spring Garden Tower, from Baldwin Park to the south

The Tivoli Condominiums, next to Baldwin Park, on 19th Street

The Tivoli Condominiums, next to Baldwin Park, on 19th Street

Looking south at the Center City skyline, from Baldwin Park

Looking south at the Center City skyline, from Baldwin Park

Future site of Museum Towers II highrise apartment building, on 18th Street

Future site of Museum Towers II highrise apartment building, on 18th Street

Rendering of the tower of Museum Towers II

Rendering of the tower of Museum Towers II

Looking west, from 18th Street

Looking west, from 18th Street

Entrance to Museum Towers parking lot, where Buttonwood Street would be

Entrance to Museum Towers parking lot, where Buttonwood Street would be

Entrance and lobby, for both buildings, of Museum Towers

Entrance and lobby, for both buildings, of Museum Towers

Looking south, towards Center City, from 18th & Buttonwood Streets

Looking south, towards Center City, from 18th & Buttonwood Streets

Looking south into Baldwin Park, from 18th Street

Looking south into Baldwin Park, from 18th Street

Looking south down 18th Street

Looking south down 18th Street

Community College of Philadelphia campus buildings, across 18th Street

Community College of Philadelphia campus buildings, across 18th Street

Retail on 19th Street, just south of Spring Garden Street

Retail on 19th Street, just south of Spring Garden Street

Looking north into Baldwin Park, from 18th Street

Looking north into Baldwin Park, from 18th Street

Looking south down Franklintown Boulevard

Looking south down Franklintown Boulevard

Development site at Callowhill Street and Franklintown Boulevard

Development site at Callowhill Street and Franklintown Boulevard

Mormon Temple, under construction, at Vine St. and Franklintown Boulevard

Mormon Temple, under construction, at Vine St. and Franklintown Boulevard

Parking lot, at Vine Street and Franklintown Blouevard, could be developed soon

Parking lot, at Vine Street and Franklintown Blouevard, could be developed soon

Family Courts Building, at 19th and Vine Streets, will be sold to developers soon to be converted to a luxury hotel

Family Courts Building, at 19th and Vine Streets, will be sold to developers soon to be converted to a luxury hotel

Back of the Central Library, at 19th and Callowhill Streets, could see an expansion sometime soon

Back of the Central Library, at 19th and Callowhill Streets, could see an expansion sometime soon

The Barnes Foundation, on The Ben Franklin Parkway

The Barnes Foundation, on The Ben Franklin Parkway

Looking east down The Parkway

Looking east down The Parkway

Looking west down The Parkway, towards the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Looking west down The Parkway, towards the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Sister Cities Park will be down the street from Museum Towers II

Sister Cities Park will be down the street from Museum Towers II

The submerged City Branch rail right-of-way is south of Baldwin Park and could be converted for mass-transit and park use

The submerged City Branch rail right-of-way is south of Baldwin Park and could be converted for mass-transit and park use

Tivoli Condominiums, at 19th and Hamilton Streets, across from Baldwin Park and the future site of the Museum Towers II townhouses

Tivoli Condominiums, at 19th and Hamilton Streets, across from Baldwin Park and the future site of the Museum Towers II townhouses

The Granary Apartments, at 19th and Callowhill Streets, has several new retail establishments

The Granary Apartments, at 19th and Callowhill Streets, has several new retail establishments

Best Western Hotel, at 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, will soon be replaced with Rodin Square, including a large new Whole Foods supermarket

Best Western Hotel, at 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, will soon be replaced with Rodin Square, including a large new Whole Foods supermarket

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New apartment development, with a major grocery store, could be transformative for Chestnut East

rendering of 1118 chestnutA new apartment and retail development, on the 1100 block of Chestnut Street, could lead to a long-awaited transformation of this stretch of Chestnut Street, adjacent to Thomas Jefferson University and HospitalChestnut Street East has been somewhat depressed for many years, with low-end retail, little activity at night, and quite a bit of vacancy in the retail spaces and the upper floors of buildings, many of them historic structures with attractive architecture.  The area has not been affected yet, in a major way, by the upscale development boom happening in most of the surrounding neighborhoods of Center City.  This new development, which includes the renovation of one of the most derelict looking buildings and replacing two others at 1118 Chestnut Street (and which may include a very high-profile grocery store), is just what Chestnut East needs to finally take part in the Center City boom.

The new development is being built by Brickstone Realty and designed by Blackney Hayes Architects.  The oldest building, on the west side of the site, will be renovated and the neighboring buildings on the east side will be demolished and replaced with a seven storey building connected to the renovated one.  It will have 80 apartments, on the third through the seventh floors, and 70,000 square feet of retail space on the first and second floors.  There will be 60 one-bedroom units, ranging in size from 300 to 820 square feet, and 20 two-bedroom units, ranging in size from 1,000 to 1,100 square feet.  There will be no parking, but there will be 27 bike parking spaces.  This is the third major development, in this part of Center City, that will not have parking on site (the others include 1213 Walnut Street, around the corner from 1118 Chestnut, and The Sansom, at 16th and Sansom Streets).  The developers said that they have talked to nearby parking garage owners about reserving spaces if they have enough parking demand for it, but like with the other projects, they don’t expect much demand for parking in this convenient and transit-rich section of the city.  The retail may be the most exciting aspect of this project.  The developers may have several separate stores or they may use the first floor for one large grocery store.  Rumors are swirling that the grocery store would be Trader Joe’s, but a member of the development team wouldn’t confirm that when I spoke to him after a recent Zoning Board hearing.  Trader Joe’s would be a very high-profile tenant, as the Trader Joe’s at 22nd and Market Streets is VERY popular and crowded almost all the time, and that would bring renewed attention, and likely more residents and development, to this area.  We will likely find out soon what the tenant, or tenants, will be because the developers received approval from the Zoning Board on October 30 and expect to start construction within the next few months.

This is certainly not the only development happening in that area, though.  Market Street East is likely to see a couple long-awaited developments, as well, including a large mixed-use development at 12th & Market, a half block away from 1118 Chestnut and across from the Reading Terminal building, and the renovation of The Gallery mall (details of both those developments are supposed to be revealed early next year).  The former Strawbridge and Clothier building is, also, rumored to be getting a large and upscale food market called Eataly.  Chestnut Street East has seen a bit of development in recent years, such as the renovation of 1201 Chestnut Street (at the same intersection as this project) into The Commonwealth Apartments and the renovation of the very historic Victory Building, at 10th & Chestnut, into The Victory Condominiums.  DiBruno Brothers has, also, opened up an upscale deli at 9th & Chestnut Streets.  A couple new developments are planned nearby on Chestnut, including the renovation of the Bailey Building, on the 1200 block, into a trendy hotel and the construction of a 52-storey hotel at 15th & Chestnut Streets.  And, Walnut Street nearby is very busy and has seen the construction of a couple new medical buildings recently and may see the construction of a 26-storey apartment building and hotel on the 1200 block soon.  The new development at 1118 Chestnut will probably make those planned developments more likely, as well as, lead to several more being built because of the redevelopment of these blighted properties.

If you are thinking of buying or selling a home or investment property in this improving area of the city, or any other area, please contact me at Gabriel.gottlieb@lnf.com or check out my Long & Foster agent portal, here, or learn about our Long & Foster Center City office (near 1118 Chestnut Street), here.  You can, also, view my Facebook realtor page, Gabriel G. Philly Realtor, or my twitter page, @GabrielGPhilaRE.  And, you can view the Zoning Board approval, here, and my pictures of the site and neighborhood, below.

Rendering of 1118 Chestnut Street

Rendering of 1118 Chestnut Street

Buildings at 1118-28 Chestnut Street at present

Buildings at 1118-28 Chestnut Street at present

Buildings on the eastern end of the site will be demolished and replaced with new construction

Buildings on the eastern end of the site will be demolished and replaced with new construction

1128 Chestnut Street will be renovated

1128 Chestnut Street will be renovated

Retail space at 1118 Chestnut Street could have Trader Joe's

Retail space at 1118 Chestnut Street could have Trader Joe’s

Street sign for 12th Street, in front of 1118 Chestnut Street

Street sign for 12th Street, in front of 1118 Chestnut Street

Looking east down Chestnut Street, shows Jefferson Hospital on the right

Looking east down Chestnut Street, shows Jefferson Hospital on the right

Across Chestnut Street, from 1118 Chestnut Street

Across Chestnut Street, from 1118 Chestnut Street

Looking west on Chestnut Street

Looking west on Chestnut Street

Looking south on 12th Street

Looking south on 12th Street

Looking north on 12th Street towards Market Street and Loews PSFS Hotel and Girard Estate site

Looking north on 12th Street towards Market Street and Loews PSFS Hotel and Girard Estate site

1201 Chestnut Street, also known as The Commonwealth Apartments, on the northwest corner of 12th and Chestnut Streets

1201 Chestnut Street, also known as The Commonwealth Apartments, on the northwest corner of 12th and Chestnut Streets

Beneficial Savings Fund building, on the southwest corner of 12th and Chestnut Streets

Beneficial Savings Fund building, on the southwest corner of 12th and Chestnut Streets

The White Building Condominiums, on the southeast corner of 12th and Chestnut Streets

The White Building Condominiums, on the southeast corner of 12th and Chestnut Streets

Looking west on Market Street, from 12th Street, towards City Hall

Looking west on Market Street, from 12th Street, towards City Hall

Looking east on Market Street, from 12th Street, with Reading Terminal building on the left and the Girard Estate site on the right

Looking east on Market Street, from 12th Street, with Reading Terminal building on the left and the Girard Estate site on the right

Girard Estate site on Market Street

Girard Estate site on Market Street

Historically-certified Steven Girard Building on 12th Street, between Market and Chestnut Streets

Historically-certified Steven Girard Building on 12th Street, between Market and Chestnut Streets

Vacant buildings, at 11th and Chestnut Streets, being renovated a bit

Vacant buildings, at 11th and Chestnut Streets, being renovated a bit

The Victory Condominiums, at 11th and Chestnut Streets

The Victory Condominiums, at 11th and Chestnut Streets

The Bailey Building, on the 1200 block of Chestnut

The Bailey Building, on the 1200 block of Chestnut

Future site of W and Element hotel at 15th and Chestnut Streets

Future site of W and Element hotel at 15th and Chestnut Streets

1100 block of Walnut Street

1100 block of Walnut Street, shows Jefferson campus and Forrest Theatre

Future site of 1213 Walnut Street, a 26-storey apartment and hotel building

Future site of 1213 Walnut Street, a 26-storey apartment and hotel building

My Long & Foster real estate office, in the Curtis Center at 6th and Walnut Streets, across from Independence Hall

My Long & Foster real estate office, in the Curtis Center at 6th and Walnut Streets, across from Independence Hall

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Folsom Powerhouse will add some of the most modern and sustainable housing in the Francisville neighborhood

rendering of folsom powerhouseMy second article on this blog was about the up-and-coming Francisville neighborhood, just north of the Spring Garden neighborhood.  Francisville is the oldest neighborhood of North Philadelphia and the original streets were laid out to be parallel and perpendicular to Ridge Avenue, just west of Broad Street and north of Fairmount Avenue.  When the street grid of Center City was expanded northward, it caused a lot of wedge-shaped blocks to be created in Francisville and made the neighborhood very confusing to walk around.  Perhaps that is one reason why Francisville took a while to experience the revitalization and building boom of neighboring communities, but now the neighborhood is experiencing the same kind of building boom and vacant lots are being developed on almost every block that still has them.  My first article about Francisville focused on quality affordable housing being built around 15th and Poplar Streets, as most housing a few years ago was being built by the Francisville Neighborhood Development Corporation.  But today, most of the development is by private developers, building market rate housing and new retail space, as well.

One of the most innovative housing developments being built right now in Francisville is a development called the Folsom Powerhouse, being developed by PostGreen Homes, Equinox Management & Construction, and designed by Interface Studios.  The unusual name refers to Folsom Street, a small street a block north of Fairmount Avenue that runs from 18th Street to 17th Street, across from the recently renovated Francisville Playground.  Most of the block at 18th and Folsom will be redeveloped by a housing development that will have a mix of townhouses, condos, and rentals.  There will be townhouses along Folsom and Olive Streets and apartments and condos at the corners along 18th Street, for a total of 31 housing units.  There will, also, be a space for a café or small restaurant at the corner of 18th and Folsom, and three existing rowhomes on the site will remain.  The housing units will have many sustainable features, such as Energy Star appliances and HVAC, green rooves, solar panels, energy-efficient windows, and clean indoor air quality, among others.  The exterior will be covered in brown and gray brick, corrugated metal, large windows, and wood paneling, that will include wooden planters on the first floor.  There will be glow-in-the-dark paint, on the ground level wall, that will create a pattern at night shaped like roots, designed by artist Jenny Sabin.  There will, also, be metal and stone “super stoops”, for the townhouses, that will provide much room for residents to sit on and meet their neighbors.  Parking will be accessible from Olive Street and there will, also, be bike parking.  I attended the groundbreaking ceremony a few weeks ago.  At the ceremony, neighborhood residents were encouraged to give feedback about the neighborhood and project.

The Folsom Powerhouse is just a block north of Fairmount Avenue.  That stretch of Fairmount Avenue is experiencing a building boom of new development that is bringing several new apartment buildings with retail to the avenue.  There are new apartment developments, with retail, on Fairmount at 1720 Fairmount, at 19th Street, at Uber Street, and two at 15th Street.  There have, also, been several townhouse developments along Fairmount.  On the other side of the Francisville Playground there are several other developments being built and a large apartment and townhouse development planned for a triangular-shaped block across from the playground.  Further east in Francisville several developments are underway, such as the Vineyards on 16, and several more are planned, including several developments on long-dormant Ridge Avenue, which community groups are hoping to turn into another live/work district for artists.  As if all that isn’t enough, the vacant Divine Lorraine Hotel, at Broad and Fairmount, is scheduled to be renovated into apartments soon by EBRM Realty.

If you are interested in buying or selling a home or investment property in this rapidly up-and-coming neighborhood, or any other in the city, please contact me at Gabriel.gottlieb@lnf.com or check out my Long & Foster agent portal, here, or learn more about our Long & Foster Center City office, here.  You can, also, view my Facebook realtor page, Gabriel G. Philly Realtor, or my twitter page, @GabrielGPhilaRE.  And, you can learn more about the Folsom Powerhouse on their website, here, and check out renderings and my pictures of the site, the groundbreaking ceremony, and the neighborhood, below.

Rendering of Folsom Powerhouse

Rendering of Folsom Powerhouse

Future site of Folsom Powerhouse, @ 18th and Folsom Streets

Future site of Folsom Powerhouse, @ 18th and Folsom Streets

Rendering of Folsom Powerhouse, at 18th and Folsom Streets

Rendering of Folsom Powerhouse, at 18th and Folsom Streets

Site of Folsom Powerhouse, from 18th and Olive Streets

Site of Folsom Powerhouse, from 18th and Olive Streets

Rendering from 18th and Olive Streets

Rendering from 18th and Olive Streets

Looking down Olive Street, from 18th Street

Looking down Olive Street, from 18th Street

Looking at the future site of the Folsom Powerhouse, from Folsom Street

Looking at the future site of the Folsom Powerhouse, from Folsom Street

Facades of Folsom Powerhouse townhouses

Facades of Folsom Powerhouse townhouses

Rendering of the townhouses up close

Rendering of the townhouses up close

Close up of the "superstoops", with artistic railings by Jenny Sabin

Close up of the “superstoops”, with artistic railings by Jenny Sabin

Glow-in-the-dark paintings by artist Jenny Sabin

Glow-in-the-dark paintings by artist Jenny Sabin

Folsom Street street sign

Folsom Street street sign

Looking east down Folsom Street

Looking east down Folsom Street

Street signs at 18th and Francis Streets

Street signs at 18th and Francis Streets

Francisville Playground, across Francis Street from future Folsom Powerhouse

Francisville Playground, across Francis Street from future Folsom Powerhouse

Looking east down Francis Street

Looking east down Francis Street

Looking west down Francis Street

Looking west down Francis Street

Looking south down 18th Street, from the corner of Folsom Street

Looking south down 18th Street, from the corner of Folsom Street

Crowds gathered for groundbreaking ceremony of Folsom Powerhouse

Crowds gathered for groundbreaking ceremony of Folsom Powerhouse

Ceremonial digging at groundbreaking of Folsom Powerhouse

Ceremonial digging at groundbreaking of Folsom Powerhouse

Sign at groundbreaking describing the project

Sign at groundbreaking describing the project

Community input board at groundbreaking ceremony

Community input board at groundbreaking ceremony

People at community input board

People at community input board

Looking at the site from 17th and Folsom Streets, overgrown community garden in the foreground

Looking at the site from 17th and Folsom Streets, overgrown community garden in the foreground

Peanut (art) Gallery at 18th Street and Fairmount Avenue

Peanut (art) Gallery at 18th Street and Fairmount Avenue

Vacant bank building @ 18th and Fairmount

Vacant bank building @ 18th and Fairmount

Looking west on Fairmount Avenue, from 18th Street

Looking west on Fairmount Avenue, from 18th Street

Looking east down Fairmount Avenue, from 18th Street

Looking east down Fairmount Avenue, from 18th Street

The "Spring Gardens", a couple blocks south of future Folsom Powerhouse

The “Spring Gardens”, a couple blocks south of future Folsom Powerhouse

Carriage House Apartments, just south of 18th & Fairmount

Carriage House Apartments, just south of 18th & Fairmount

Modern apartment building on the 1700 block of Fairmount Avenue

Modern apartment building on the 1700 block of Fairmount Avenue

Site at 1720 Fairmount Avenue, will have a 21-unit apartment building and retail

Site at 1720 Fairmount Avenue, will have a 21-unit apartment building and retail

JBJ Soul Homes, being built @ 15th Street, Ridge and Fairmount Avenues

JBJ Soul Homes, being built @ 15th Street, Ridge and Fairmount Avenues

Divine Lorraine Hotel, at Broad Street, Ridge and Fairmount Avenues, may be renovated into apartments soon

Divine Lorraine Hotel, at Broad Street, Ridge and Fairmount Avenues, may be renovated into apartments soon

New apartment building, with retail, @ 19th Street and Fairmount Avenue

New apartment building, with retail, @ 19th Street and Fairmount Avenue

Another new apartment building with retail, @ Fairmount Avenue and Uber Street

Another new apartment building with retail, @ Fairmount Avenue and Uber Street

Vineyards on 16, under construction in Francisville

Vineyards on 16, under construction in Francisville

New homes @ 15th and Poplar Streets in Francisville

New homes @ 15th and Poplar Streets in Francisville

Looking south down Ridge Avenue, towards Broad Street, in Francisville

Looking south down Ridge Avenue, towards Broad Street, in Francisville

Looking north up Ridge Avenue, towards Girard Avenue

Looking north up Ridge Avenue, towards Girard Avenue

New art gallery on Ridge Avenue in Francisville, near 17th Street

New art gallery on Ridge Avenue in Francisville, near 17th Street

Site of future large development, north of Francisville Playground

Site of future large development, north of Francisville Playground

New townhouses on 19th Street, north of Francisville Playground

New townhouses on 19th Street, north of Francisville Playground

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FringeArts creates new performance and artistic hub on the Delaware waterfront

fringearts new hqThe Philly Fringe/Live Arts Festival is a unique, avant-garde arts festival held in the city every September.  Fringe festivals have become popular, in some cities, as a way to show unusual and avant-garde performances that wouldn’t normally be seen in more mainstream venues.  Philadelphia’s Fringe Festival is one of the biggest and had merged with another, similar festival, the Live Arts Festival, a few years ago.  Over the course of the two to three week festival, the Philly Fringe would use various venues in neighborhoods like Old City, Northern Liberties, Washington Square West, and Fishtown for performances of unique dance, theatre, and music.  The Festival organizers would plan throughout the year for the popular and ever-growing festival, that was attracting tourists from far and away.  The festival’s organizers never had a permanent venue to do their planning in or for events at other times of the year, so a few years ago they sought out a permanent home for year-round programming and planning.

They, eventually, decided to buy an old, unused water pumping station at the intersection of Delaware Avenue and Race Street.  The pumping station is a little red-brick building, which was built in 1903, almost underneath the Ben Franklin Bridge.  It used to pump water to fire hydrants in much of Center City, until it was decommissioned in 2005, and it had been largely overlooked and forgotten.  The organization, which recently changed its name to FringeArts, is using the renovated building as their headquarters, not just for the annual festival, but for year-round programming.  To that end, they have their offices and rehearsal space in the 10,000 square foot building, but the featured space is a 240-seat theatre, with retractable seating, and gallery space for fine art shows.  There is, also, a restaurant/café that will have outdoor seating on a plaza next to Race Street, which will replace a small driveway next to the building.  The outdoor plaza will be used for the festival and other events, which may also be held on the Race Street Pier, a park built on an old pier, across Delaware Avenue, in the shadow of the Ben Franklin Bridge.  Both outdoor locations will have incredible views of the Ben Franklin Bridge, day and night.  The bathrooms in the FringeArts headquarters will be available for unaffiliated events on the Race Street Pier, so the City’s Delaware River Waterfront Corporation is paying for those facilities.  The new FringeArts headquarters and space will keep this part of Delaware Avenue and the waterfront busy with edgy performing and creative arts, extending the large artistic community of Old City and Northern Liberties to a once forgotten section of the Delaware waterfront.

The FringeArts headquarters and the Race Street Pier are connected back to Old City by a colorful, well-lit “connector”, under I-95 and the Market/Frankford line, known as the Race Street Connector.  The Race Street Connector has a large sign pointing to the river and the city and colorful lights and a video feed on a screen on top of the overpass, from a camera facing the river, of the surface of the water.  Just a couple of blocks from the FringeArts headquarters, a developer would like to build a modern apartment tower with retail, at Second and Race Streets, and several new developments are planned for Old City, such as housing along Second Street, Market Street, and a new, upscale market at Third & Arch Streets.  Northern Liberties and South Kensington are experiencing new development, such as an expansion of The Piazza developments, the Soko Lofts, and Liberty Square.  Along the waterfront, major residential development is planned for Delaware Avenue and Vine Street, Delaware Avenue and Callowhill Street, The Pennthouses at 700 North Delaware Avenue (under construction), an apartment building at Pier 34; just south of the Dockside Condominiums; and townhouses at Columbus Boulevard and Catharine Street.  Developer Core Realty is planning a large entertainment center at Frankford and Delaware Avenues and a redevelopment of Canal Street, off of Delaware Avenue, with small and unique shops, restaurants, and cafes.  Another developer is planning to build a House of Blues concert hall about a mile north of the FringeArts headquarters and the SugarHouse casino is about to expand, as well.  And, the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation is designing a plan to redevelop Penn’s Landing with more entertainment and recreation, imbetween new residential and commercial development, and is breaking ground today on a new park on Pier 53 on Columbus Boulevard (Delaware Avenue south).  So, as you can see, the new FringeArts headquarters adds a diverse and avant-garde artistic element to the rapidly developing Delaware waterfront.

If you are interested in buying or selling a home or investment property in the neighborhoods near the Delaware River waterfront, or any other neighborhood in the city, please contact me at Gabriel.gottlieb@lnf.com or check out my Long & Foster agent portal, here, or check out our Long & Foster Center City office, here.  You can, also, view my realtor Facebook page, Gabriel G. Philly Realtor, and my twitter page, @GabrielGPhilaRE.  And, you can learn more about FringeArts and their new home on their website, here.  Also, you can see my photos of the new FringeArts home and the waterfront and surrounding neighborhood, below.

The new FringeArts headquarters and performance space

The new FringeArts headquarters and performance space

FringeArts headquarters from a distance

FringeArts headquarters from a distance

The new FringeArts headquarters up close

The new FringeArts headquarters up close

The FringeArts headquarters at night

The FringeArts headquarters at night

The northern side of the FringeArts headquarters will have a public plaza and a café with outdoor seating

The northern side of the FringeArts headquarters will have a public plaza and a café with outdoor seating

Sign announcing FringeArts' new home

Sign announcing FringeArts’ new home

Event space inside the FringeArts headquarters

Event space inside the FringeArts headquarters

The front of the building has a reminder of the building's history

The front of the building has a reminder of the building’s history

Looking east towards the Delaware River

Looking east towards the Delaware River

View of the Ben Franklin Bridge from where the FringeArts' plaza will be

View of the Ben Franklin Bridge from where the FringeArts’ plaza will be

Race Street Pier, across Delaware Avenue from the FringeArts headquarters

Race Street Pier, across Delaware Avenue from the FringeArts headquarters

Ben Franklin Bridge at night

Ben Franklin Bridge at night

Pier 9, on Delaware Avenue, may be renovated soon

Pier 9, on Delaware Avenue, may be renovated soon

Looking south down Delaware Avenue, with the Comfort Inn next to the FringeArts headquarters

Looking south down Delaware Avenue, with the Comfort Inn next to the FringeArts headquarters

Looking north up Delaware Avenue and underneath the Ben Franklin Bridge

Looking north up Delaware Avenue and underneath the Ben Franklin Bridge

Underneath the Ben Franklin Bridge

Underneath the Ben Franklin Bridge

Looking west on Race Street, towards the Race Street Connector and Old City

Looking west on Race Street, towards the Race Street Connector and Old City

Penn's Landing boat basin

Penn’s Landing boat basin

Great Plaza at Penn's Landing may be redeveloped soon

Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing may be redeveloped soon

La Veranda restaurant is nearby at Pier 3 apartments

La Veranda restaurant is nearby at Pier 3 apartments

Camden waterfront, across from Race Street Pier and Penn's Landing, has concerts and other entertainment

Camden waterfront, across from Race Street Pier and Penn’s Landing, has concerts and other entertainment

Pier 34 is slated to have a 16-storey apartment building soon

Pier 34 is slated to have a 16-storey apartment building soon

Dockside Condos, south of Penn's Landing on Delaware Avenue

Dockside Condos, south of Penn’s Landing on Delaware Avenue

Site of future apartment building at Delaware Avenue and Vine Street, just north of the Ben Franklin Bridge

Site of future apartment building at Delaware Avenue and Vine Street, just north of the Ben Franklin Bridge

Future site of a large apartment development at Delaware Avenue and Callowhill Street

Future site of a large apartment development at Delaware Avenue and Callowhill Street

Festival Pier, on north Delaware Avenue, has concerts and may be redeveloped soon

Festival Pier, on north Delaware Avenue, has concerts and may be redeveloped soon

SoundGarden Hall, at Delaware Avenue and Spring Garden Street, has many up and coming bands

SoundGarden Hall, at Delaware Avenue and Spring Garden Street, has many up and coming bands

New river walk trail, at Delaware Avenue and Penn Street

New river walk trail, at Delaware Avenue and Penn Street

The Pennthouses at 700 North Delaware Avenue

The Pennthouses at 700 North Delaware Avenue

Ajax warehouse, at Delaware and Frankford Avenues, will be the Canal North entertainment complex

Ajax warehouse, at Delaware and Frankford Avenues, will be the Canal North entertainment complex

Rendering of the House of Blues concert hall, to be built on the waterfront about a mile north of the FringeArts headquarters

Rendering of the House of Blues concert hall, to be built on the waterfront about a mile north of the FringeArts headquarters

Site of future apartment building at Second and Race Streets

Site of future apartment building at Second and Race Streets

Race Street Connector, pointing west towards the city

Race Street Connector, pointing west towards the city

Race Street Connector, with "Rivercam" screen, pointing west towards the Delaware River

Race Street Connector, with “Rivercam” screen, pointing west towards the Delaware River

Looking south down Second Street in Old City

Looking south down Second Street in Old City

The Arden Theatre, at Second and Church Streets, is near the FringeArts headquarters

The Arden Theatre, at Second and Church Streets, is near the FringeArts headquarters

Second and Market Streets in Old City

Second and Market Streets in Old City

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Rodin Square, a large apartment complex with a mega-sized Whole Foods in Fairmount, will begin construction soon

rodinsquare2Another large apartment complex, this time with a one acre-plus sized Whole Foods supermarket, is going to break ground soon in the Fairmount neighborhood.  This complex will be called Rodin Square and it will be behind the Rodin Museum, and just north of the Ben Franklin Parkway.  It will replace the Best Western hotel, which takes up most of the block bounded by Hamilton Street, Pennsylvania Avenue, 21st Street, 22nd Street, and Spring Garden Street.  A few years ago, a developer wanted to build a highrise condo tower, to be called Parkway 22, but those plans fell through because of the recession (the developers did demolish one building of the Best Western, that was at the corner of 22nd and Spring Garden Streets).  The Whole Foods market is moving from across 21st Street, where it is located in a building with a surface parking lot.  That site may, also, be redeveloped sometime soon.  Rodin Square has been approved by the City Planning Commission and Zoning Board of Adjustment to begin construction.

This new mixed-use complex is being built by Dalian Development and designed by Barton Partners and MV&A Architects.  It will have 293 luxury apartments in a nine-storey building, that will be 122 feet tall.  The first floor will have the 55,000 square foot Whole Foods and 19,000 square feet of other retail.  The supermarket will have a 5,000 square foot café, which may include outdoor seating, and the market will have a glass curtain wall along Pennsylvania Avenue and Hamilton Street (the glass wall may have windows that open to the outdoor seating).  There will, also, be retail at the corner of 22nd and Spring Garden Streets.  The supermarket will be on two levels, and there will be office space at the second level of the 22nd and Spring Garden corner and a community room for the residents, on the second level, at 21st and Hamilton Streets.  The main entrance to the residences will be on 21st Street, with stairs in the lobby leading to the community room.  There will be 270 parking spaces for residents in an above ground garage on the 21st Street side and 172 parking spaces underground for the customers of the supermarket and other retail.  The loading docks will be hidden in a special driveway running from 21st Street to 22nd Street.  The apartment tower will be divided into two wings coming off a central portion and will be covered in large glass windows, except on the north side of the central portion, which will have some metal panels.  There is an additional empty lot on the north, Spring Garden Street side that is still for sale, but that could be bought by the developers, of Rodin Square, to be developed in the future.  There will be a green roof on the top of the highrise portion and a large patio and green roof, with a pool, above the supermarket facing Pennsylvania Avenue, the Rodin Museum, and the Parkway.

The plaza overlooking Pennsylvania Avenue and the Parkway is one of the most interesting features of this project.  The layout of this building with a plaza and a shorter highrise building behind it is reminiscent of mid-twentieth century modern hotels that were common in cities like Los Angeles or Miami, unlike the highrise luxury apartment and condo buildings in most of Center City.  This site, adjacent to the Parkway, is one of the few locations in Center City where this style of residential living, with this type of layout, could be built.  Other developments, that have recently happened in the Fairmount neighborhood (also known as Franklintown, south of Spring Garden Street) include the Barnes Foundation museum on the Parkway at 20th Street, The Granary apartments and retail on Callowhill Street between 19th & 20th Streets, and The Tivoli Condominiums and townhouses, at 19th and Hamilton Streets.  Future developments in the neighborhood include Museum Towers II, planned for 19th Street, the Mormon Temple, under construction at 17th and Vine Streets, a large mixed-use project, at 16th & Vine Streets, proposed by the Church of Latter Day Saints, the expansion of the Central Branch of the Free Library, at 20th and Callowhill Streets, the renovation of the soon-to-be former Family Courts building, on Vine Street, into a luxury hotel, and another highrise apartment tower planned to be built over the submerged Reading Viaduct City Branch at 21st Street, which may have a Bus Rapid Transit line and a jogging trail along it someday.  The Parkway is experiencing many enhancements, including the completed Sister Cities Park, renovations to Dilworth Plaza at City Hall, which are underway, and rebuilding of Love Park and Eakins Oval, at either ends of the Parkway.  South of the Parkway are other residential developments, such as the 1900 Arch apartments, The Arch apartments, at 17th and Arch Streets, and the 1919 Market Street apartment tower, at 20th and Market Streets.  Also, developers Liberty Property Trust would like to build office buildings at 19th and Arch and 18th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard, as well as, a large mixed-use project on Arch Street between 18th and 19th Streets.

Having this mega-sized store, and another large, swanky apartment complex along Pennsylvania Avenue, would be a nice enhancement of the Art Museum neighborhood.  If you are interested in buying or selling a home or investment property in Center City, or other neighborhoods in the city, then please contact me at Gabriel.gottlieb@lnf.com or check out my Long & Foster agent portal, here, or learn more about our Long & Foster Center City office, here.  You can, also, view my Facebook realtor page, Gabriel G. Philly Realtor, or my twitter page, @GabrielGPhilaRE.  You can, also, view the Zoning Board of Adjustment approval, here, and check out renderings and my pictures of the site and neighborhood, below.

Rendering of Rodin Square, from south side

Rendering of Rodin Square, from south side

Rodin Square, from Pennsylvania Avenue

Rodin Square, from Pennsylvania Avenue

The Best Western hotel, from the corner of 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue

The Best Western hotel, from the corner of 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue

Best Western hotel along Pennsylvania Avenue, where façade of Whole Foods will be

Best Western hotel along Pennsylvania Avenue, where façade of Whole Foods will be

Looking at Best Western hotel from 22nd Street

Looking at Best Western hotel from 22nd Street

Sign of the Best Western Center City Hotel

Sign of the Best Western Center City Hotel

Looking at Best Western parking lot, from 22nd Street, where demolished hotel building was

Looking at Best Western parking lot, from 22nd Street, where demolished hotel building was

Looking at Rodin Museum and grounds, from Pennsylvania Avenue

Looking at Rodin Museum and grounds, from Pennsylvania Avenue

Von Colln Memorial Field, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue

Von Colln Memorial Field, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue

Pennsylvania Avenue street sign

Pennsylvania Avenue street sign

Looking towards the Rodin Museum and skyline, from 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue

Looking towards the Rodin Museum and skyline, from 22nd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue

Looking east on Pennsylvania Avenue

Looking east on Pennsylvania Avenue

The Parkway House apartments, across 22nd Street from future Rodin Square site

The Parkway House apartments, across 22nd Street from future Rodin Square site

Looking west down Pennsylvania Avenue, towards Fairmount Park

Looking west down Pennsylvania Avenue, towards Fairmount Park

Looking south towards Park Towne Place apartments

Looking south towards Park Towne Place apartments

Looking south down 22nd Street

Looking south down 22nd Street

Looking west down Spring Garden Street, towards Eakins Oval and the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Looking west down Spring Garden Street, towards Eakins Oval and the Philadelphia Museum of Art

The corner of 22nd and Spring Garden Streets

The corner of 22nd and Spring Garden Streets

Looking north up 22nd Street

Looking north up 22nd Street

Empty lot, on the north side of Rodin Square, could be developed in the future

Empty lot, on the north side of Rodin Square, could be developed in the future

The Philadelphia County Medical Society building, at 21st and Spring Garden Streets

The Philadelphia County Medical Society building, at 21st and Spring Garden Streets

Looking east down Spring Garden Street

Looking east down Spring Garden Street

Best Western Hotel, at the corner of 21st and Hamilton Streets

Best Western Hotel, at the corner of 21st and Hamilton Streets

Looking south down 21st Street

Looking south down 21st Street

Retail at Rodin Place, at 21st and Hamilton Streets

Retail at Rodin Place, at 21st and Hamilton Streets

CityView Condominiums, across 21st Street from the future site of Rodin Square

CityView Condominiums, across 21st Street from the future site of Rodin Square

Reading Viaduct (City Branch) could have a Bus Rapid Transit line and jogging path, and another apartment built on top here at 21st and Hamilton Streets

Reading Viaduct (City Branch) could have a Bus Rapid Transit line and jogging path, and another apartment built on top here at 21st and Hamilton Streets

Tivoli Condominiums, at 19th and Hamilton Streets

Tivoli Condominiums, at 19th and Hamilton Streets

The Granary apartments, at 20th and Callowhill Streets

The Granary apartments, at 20th and Callowhill Streets

Whole Foods' current location, at 20th and Callowhill Streets

Whole Foods’ current location, at 20th and Callowhill Streets

Future site of Museum Towers II, on 19th Street

Future site of Museum Towers II, on 19th Street

Future site of the Free Library Central Branch expansion, at 19th and Callowhill Streets

Future site of the Free Library Central Branch expansion, at 19th and Callowhill Streets

Family Courts building, at 19th and Vine Streets, will be renovated soon into a luxury hotel

Family Courts building, at 19th and Vine Streets, will be renovated soon into a luxury hotel

Free Library Central Branch, at 20th and Vine Streets, just off the Ben Franklin Parkway

Free Library Central Branch, at 20th and Vine Streets, just off the Ben Franklin Parkway

The Barnes Foundation museum entrance, on 21st Street

The Barnes Foundation museum entrance, on 21st Street

Meudon Gate, in front of the Rodin Museum, at 21st Street and The Parkway

Meudon Gate, in front of the Rodin Museum, at 21st Street and The Parkway

Recently renovated Rodin Museum and gardens

Recently renovated Rodin Museum and gardens

Sign announcing attractions along The Parkway

Sign announcing attractions along The Parkway

Recently renovated sidewalks along the 2200 block of The Parkway

Recently renovated sidewalks along the 2200 block of The Parkway

Looking east down The Parkway

Looking east down The Parkway

Looking west down The Parkway, towards the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Looking west down The Parkway, towards the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Von Colln Memorial Field, seen from The Parkway

Von Colln Memorial Field, seen from The Parkway

Eakins Oval may be renovated soon to have a permanent event space, similar to this temporary one called The Oval

Eakins Oval may be renovated soon to have a permanent event space, similar to this temporary one called The Oval

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Bergdoll Mansion apartments in Fairmount, at 22nd and Green Streets

Bergdoll Mansion apartments in Fairmount, at 22nd and Green Streets

Busy Fairmount Avenue, just north of future Rodin Square

Busy Fairmount Avenue, just north of future Rodin Square

Eastern State Penitentiary, on Fairmount Avenue

Eastern State Penitentiary, on Fairmount Avenue

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